CALL FOR RESEARCH PROPOSALS

It is the policy of the Swine Health Information Center to not pay indirect or overhead charges for research conducted at public institutions and universities.  If you have any questions, please contact SHIC at research@swinehealth.org.

Pork Industry 2020 Call for National Health Biosecurity Review

DEADLINE: April 14, 2020 – 5 pm CST

The American Association of Swine Veterinarians, National Pork Board, National Pork Producers Council and Swine Health Information Center are asking for proposals to identify gaps in U.S. pork industry national biosecurity that could result in the entry and domestic dissemination of diseases foreign to the U.S. pork industry.

The U.S. pork industry is complex. Categories for consideration of study include, but aren’t limited to, foreign imports, entry of foreign travelers, transportation of animals, common inputs to production and domestic market channels. Examples of national biosecurity issues within these categories could include the safety of imported feed components and other common production inputs, the movement of trucks and animals between production phases and to markets, the approved movements between markets of market sows, the activity of and potential commercial pig interaction with feral pigs, legal feeding of plate waste containing meat and other factors that will need to be identified to fulfill the project. It will the responsibility of the successful proposal to define the specific issues to include.

The objective of this review is to identify biosecurity gaps that could result in the importation and dissemination of diseases foreign to the U.S. pork industry and to objectively prioritize those gaps based on their potential to result in the introduction and spread of swine diseases. The final report will be shared with state and federal animal health officials, pork producers, veterinarians and allied industries for actions needed to address the prioritized gaps.

Proposals are to be submitted via the RFP website in the standard Word, National Pork Board research proposal format and to include a detailed budget and timeline sufficient to fulfill the scope of the project. Proposals detailing thorough work done on a shorter timeline will be given preference.

Proposal Deadline:

The deadline for submitting the written proposals for initial review is 5:00 PM CST, April 14, 2020.  Submitters whose proposals are selected for final review will be required to present the proposal and answer questions via a webinar with pork industry reviewers.

Questions:
Dr. Dave Pyburn
Chief Veterinarian
National Pork Board
dpyburn@pork.org

Dr. Paul Sundberg
Executive Director
Swine Health Information Center
psundberg@swinehealth.org

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Swine Health Information Center 2020 Call for African Swine Fever Research in Vietnam Proposals

The Swine Health Information Center is soliciting proposals to address the following priorities for African Swine Fever research in Vietnam.  The Center is interested in supporting U.S.-based researchers with research memorandums of understanding or direct contacts with university or pork production animal health researchers in Vietnam.  Proposal may be completely Vietnamese laboratory and/or field based or may contain a U.S. laboratory component (non-USDA laboratory only) but, if that is proposed, it must also include a field validation or field trial component in Vietnam.  The objective of these researchable priorities is to help Vietnamese pork production respond and recover from the ASF epidemic and to help U.S. pork producers learn lessons about ASF epidemiology and management, in preparation should the virus enter the U.S.

There is a pool of approximately $1,000,000 available for the research, averaging $100,000 per project but individual projects should be expected to be lower or higher.  Collaborative projects demonstrating the most urgency and timeliness of completion, as well as efficient use of funds, will be prioritized for funding.

Please respond with your priority topic(s) of interest via email to psundberg@swinehealth.org by  March 4, if you intend to submit a proposal.  Full proposals should be in the standard Word, SHIC proposal format, which will be sent in response to your confirmation of interest.  The full proposal should be no more than three pages to describe the project objectives, procedures to achieve the objectives, a description of the quality assurance/quality control plan, the timeline for the proposed research and the institution’s certification of the proposal.  Additional to those three pages are the proposed budget page and letters of cooperation or collaboration with the appropriate Vietnamese researchers.  Full proposals should be submitted via email to research@swinehealth.org.  The deadline for proposal submission is 5:00 PM CST, March 30.  For questions, contact Dr. Paul Sundberg at psundberg@swinehealth.org or (515) 451-6652.

Research priorities for ASF study in Vietnam, in random order:

• Determining diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of ASF ELISA antibody detection.

• Understanding protocols for biocontainment of initial infection on the farm into one barn, allowing other biosecure barns to remain in production.

• Researching innovative disinfection protocols that result in disinfection and a negative result using a commercially available ASF PCR test.

• Verifying carbon composting materials, time and temperature under different environmental conditions that will result in ASF inactivation.

• Identifying pathways of entry of the virus onto farms to enhance information for improving biosecurity.

• Investigating ASF neutralization during or following composting.

• Investigating biosecurity of feed, feed components and delivery as a risk for ASF introduction.

• Validating protocols for the targeted removal of individually housed sows when infected to move the herd to negative status.

• Researching the possible role of mice and rats as vectors for ASF infection.

• Comparing sensitivity and specificity of pen-side tests for ASF detection.

• Understanding ASF persistence in manure slurries or pits and identifying protocols or procedures to inactivate the virus in this material.

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Swine Health Information Center 2017 Call for Swine Disease Matrix Research Proposals

The mission of the Swine Health Information Center is to protect and enhance the health of the US swine herd through coordinated global disease monitoring, analysis of swine health data and targeted research investments that minimize the impact of future disease threats.

In collaboration with the American Association of Swine Veterinarians, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council, the Swine Health Information Center has developed and prioritized a list of endemic and foreign swine pathogens. Known as the Swine Disease Matrix, the list includes an assessment of the diagnostic capabilities for selected pathogens, based on a review of available literature. The Matrix and the assessment of diagnostic capabilities can be found at www.swinehealth.org.

Organizing and funding the research needed for diagnostic and informational preparedness for the prioritized, potential production diseases of the Swine Disease Matrix is a core activity of the Center. The SHIC 2017 Swine Disease Matrix research focuses on the development and validation (analytic and diagnostic) of antibody detection assays for antibodies important for monitoring for emerging diseases, determining freedom from disease (after an outbreak) or defining the extent of disease spread. The outcome of the research should be assays with a consistent and reliable means to screen populations using:

• the ability to detect antibody in sera and oral fluids,

• high throughput capacity (high volume of samples and quick turnaround time) and

• DIVA capability if vaccine availability justifies the need for a DIVA assay.

  1. The proposal should identify the laboratory with an appropriate level of biosecurity, if the work is to be done in the U.S., or should identify federal, allied industry or university coinvestigators or collaborators that have partnerships in other countries that can give access to known endemic or experimentally infected positive populations of animals for use in the project. Include related letters of cooperation.
  2. The proposal should contain a description of the fitness for use of existing antibody detection tests and the justification of why a new or modified antibody detection test is needed.
  3. The proposal should contain a description of the antibody detection technology proposed to be used. The veterinary diagnostic labs must be able to use the test in the proposed format. If a test or technology other than the standard ELISA technology commonly used in today’s laboratories are proposed, strong justification is needed for why a specific, alternative technology may be better.
  4. The proposal should contain a full description of the methods proposed to be used in the assay development in detail enough that the description can lead to reproducibility of the methodology in other laboratories.
  5. The proposal should include a two-page curriculum vitae for each of the principle and co-principle investigators describing research experience related to the objectives of this project.
  6. The proposal should include a detailed three column budget showing SHIC, laboratory and total costs for the project.


Full proposals need to be submitted to research@swinehealth.org by midnight, August 9, 2017. For questions, please contact Dr. Paul Sundberg, SHIC Executive Director, at psundberg@swinehealth.org.

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Swine Health Information Center 2017 Call for Swine Disease Matrix Research Preproposals

The mission of the Swine Health Information Center is to protect and enhance the health of the US swine herd through coordinated global disease monitoring, analysis of swine health data and targeted research investments that minimize the impact of future disease threats.

In collaboration with the American Association of Swine Veterinarians, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council, the Swine Health Information Center has developed and prioritized a list of endemic and foreign swine pathogens.

Known as the Swine Disease Matrix, the list includes an assessment of the diagnostic capabilities for selected pathogens, based on a review of available literature.  The Matrix and the assessment of diagnostic capabilities can be found at www.swinehealth.org.

Organizing and funding the research needed for diagnostic and informational preparedness for the prioritized, potential production diseases of the Swine Disease Matrix is a core activity of the Center. The SHIC 2017 Swine Disease Matrix research focuses on the development and validation (analytic and diagnostic) of antibody detection assays for antibodies important for monitoring for emerging diseases, determining freedom from disease (after an outbreak) or defining the extent of disease spread.  The outcome of the research should be assays with a consistent and reliable means to screen populations using:

• high throughput capacity (high volume of samples and quick turnaround time),

• the ability to detect antibody in sera and oral fluids and

• DIVA capability if vaccine availability justifies the need for a DIVA assay.

  1. The preproposal should identify the Swine Disease Matrix pathogen(s) of interest for this critical work.
    1. The focus of this research program is on transboundary diseases that are not endemic to the U.S.  If proposed, justification will be needed for funding a proposal to develop a new assay for an endemic pathogen.
    2. The National Pork Board has a research program specifically for foreign animal diseases so proposals for assays for classical foreign animal diseases – FMD, CSF and ASF – will not be considered for funding.
  2. The preproposal should identify the laboratory with an appropriate level of biosecurity, if the work is to be done in the U.S., or should identify federal, allied industry or university coinvestigators or collaborators that have partnerships in other countries that can give access to known endemic or experimentally infected positive populations of animals for use in the project.
  3. The preproposal should contain a brief description of the fitness for use of existing antibody detection tests and the justification of why a new or modified antibody detection test is needed.
  4. The preproposal should contain a description of the antibody detection technology proposed to be used.  Varied technologies may be proposed, but strong justification is needed for why a specific technology other than the standard ELISA technology, that is commonly used in today’s laboratories, may be better.
  5. The preproposal should contain a brief description of the methods proposed to be used in the assay development.
  6. The preproposal should contain a preliminary estimate of the expected cost to the Swine Health Information Center to conduct this work.


Full proposals need to be submitted to research@swinehealth.org by midnight, August 9, 2017. For questions, please contact Dr. Paul Sundberg, SHIC Executive Director, at psundberg@swinehealth.org.

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Swine Health Information Center Call for Swine Disease Pathogen Detection Research Proposal

The Swine Health Information Center is asking for preliminary proposal(s), in a standardized form provided by the Center, from laboratories interested in performing Swine Disease Matrix antigen detection research.  The Center is asking for laboratories to identify up to five of the pathogens on the Swine Disease Matrix for which the laboratory has the interest and capacity to conduct the research and then to submit a one-page SHIC preliminary proposal form for each of the pathogens of interest.

Also included in the preliminary proposal(s) for each pathogen should be a brief description of the laboratory’s plan for ensuring that the pathogen will not be introduced into the U.S. if it is not currently endemic.  That description could include plans for international collaborations, biosecurity/biocontainment facilities or other methods.  The important criteria for selection are the lab’s interest, capacity and biocontainment plan.  There is no need to try to select “high priority” viruses for the project.

Preliminary proposals need to be submitted to research@swinehealth.org by midnight, June 7, 2016.  Please contact Dr. Paul Sundberg at psundberg@swinehealth.org if you have any questions.

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Swine Health Information Center Call for Seneca Valley Virus Research Proposals

There are reports of increased discovery of Seneca Valley Virus (SVV) in pigs in the United States and Brazil. The Swine Health Information Center is soliciting proposals to investigate SVV epidemiology and diagnostics capability.

Proposals must be submitted in the required format provided with the RFP in order to be considered. Interlaboratory collaboration that strengthens the proposal will be a factor in funding decisions. All funded projects are expected to be completed within 6 months of funding. Final funding decisions will be made by the Swine Health Information Center.

Proposals should be emailed to research@swinehealth.org and must be received by 5:00 PM CDT September 21, 2015.

Further enquiries regarding this solicitation can be directed to Dr. Paul Sundberg by email at psundberg@swinehealth.org or by phone: 515-451-6652.

The pathogenicity of SVV in swine remains unclear. Its relevance lies mainly in its suspected link to idiopathic vesicular disease and resemblance to more clinically and economically disruptive vesicular FADs. Multiple cases of swine with vesicular lesions in the United States have been reported in which SVV was the only detected pathogen.

The Swine Health Information Center would like to investigate the pathogenicity of SVV in pigs through testing Koch’s Postulates using:

• a historic, endemic strain known to be present in the United States,

• a contemporary U.S. strain associated with a more severe clinical presentation than what would be historically expected, and

• an isolate associated with severe clinical presentation in Brazil.

The study design should consider pigs with normal immune status compared to pigs immunocompromised by a standardized immunocompromising protocol, standardized transport, and/or other stressors.

The Swine Health Information Center would like to characterize historical and contemporary U.S. SVV isolates and Brazilian SVV isolates in order to determine genetic differences among strains that could affect specificity of diagnostic tests and/or be associated with more severe clinical presentation.

The Swine Health Information Center would like to have developed new antibody detection assays that provide more rapid, cost-effective detection to assist diagnostic discovery in tissues or sera and to differentiate SVV from other disease agents of swine that cause vesicular lesions.

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